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Karen Tei Yamashita: Anime Wong Book Talk/Signing at UCLA, April 7

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Amerasia Journal Editorial Board member and longtime contributor, Karen Tei Yamashita, will be presenting her latest publication Anime Wong: Fictions of Performance (published by Coffee House Press) at book talk here at UCLA on Monday, April 7th. The book talk and signing will take place at the UCLA Law Building Room 1347 from 5:00 to 7:00PM. Discounted copies of her book will be available for purchase.  RSVP for the event here – http://animewong-aasc.eventbrite.com.

You can also catch Yamashita at the Japanese American National Museum the day before on April 6th. More information can be found at http://janm.org.

Latest Amerasia Journal addresses Asian American religions and racialization in the post-9/11 era

In 1996, Amerasia Journal published one of the first extended explorations of Asian American religions with the groundbreaking issue “Racial Spirits.” Eighteen years later, our new issue 40:1 “Asian American Religions in a Globalized World,” guest edited by Sylvia Chan-Malik (Rutgers University) and Khyati Y. Joshi (Farleigh Dickinson University), expands the scope of those investigations of religion, paying special attention to its role in Asian American and Asian immigrant communities in the post-9/11 era.

40.1.coverfinalThis issue addresses the changing demographics of Asian America through the lens of religious identifications and by examining growing ethnic and religious communities.  Members of the Asian Pacific American Religions Research Initiative (APARRI) responded to the 2012 Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life’s report on Asian American religious practices.  They addressed some of the report’s problems, pointing out how the survey’s loaded questions and the report’s subsequent framing are not only informed by preconceptions of Western and Eastern religions, but also shape how Asian Americans are perceived as “perpetual foreigners” by the public.  Chan-Malik moderates a roundtable on race, gender, and Islam that brings important Muslim feminist voices together and delves into key terms and concepts about Muslim experiences in the United States and how research is undertaken.  Philip Deslippe’s essay shows how interracial and interreligious connections involving Asian America go further back in the early twentieth century, as he examines how representations of Hinduism and yoga transformed the African American folk religion Hoodoo.

Other contributors seek to re-orient Christianity, as Rudy Busto puts it in his piece in the special issue.  His essay “The Gospel According to Rice” revisits his earlier research on Asian American evangelical groups by tackling complex theological questions about what it means to be Asian American and Christian.  So, too, does Joseph Cheah in his autobiographical musings, as he considers racial stereotyping as a form of what he calls “social sin.”  Thien-Huong Ninh’s essay tackles similar issues from a sociological perspective, tracing the history of Vietnamese American Catholics in Orange County and how their attempt to create their own parish has been fraught by matters of race and church politics.

The special issue also includes a community spotlight of the Sikh Coalition and timely book reviews of Laura Kina and Wei Ming Dariotis’s War Baby/Love Child and Ellen Wu’s The Color of Success, among other titles.

For those attending the 2014 Association of Asian American Studies annual conference in San Francisco, Amerasia will be hosting a roundtable discussing the issue and Asian American religions at 9:45 AM on Friday, April 18, 2014.

Published by UCLA’s Asian American Studies Center since 1971, Amerasia Journal is regarded as the core journal in the field of Asian American Studies.

View Table of Contents

ORDERING INFORMATION

Copies of the issue can be ordered via phone, email, or mail.  Each issue of Amerasia Journal costs $15.00 plus shipping/handling and applicable sales tax.  Please contact the Center Press for detailed ordering information.

UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press
3230 Campbell Hall
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546
Phone: 310-825-2968

Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmerasiaJournal

Amerasia Journal is published three times a year: Spring, Summer/Fall, and Winter. Annual subscriptions for Amerasia Journal are $99.00 for individuals and $445.00 for libraries and other institutions. The annual subscription price includes access to the Amerasia Journal online database, with full-text versions of published issues dating back to 1971. Instructors interested in this issue for classroom use should contact the above email address to request a review copy

Call for Papers: Indigenous Asias

Amerasia Journal Special Issue Call for Papers

Indigenous Asias

Guest Editors
Dr. Greg Dvorak (Hitotsubashi University) and Dr. Miyume Tanji (Australian National University)

Publication Date
Spring 2015

Due Date
Paper submissions (up to 5,000 words) due May 1, 2014

This special issue of Amerasia Journal is devoted to a rigorous exploration of “Indigenous Asias,” with an aim to reposition, as Vicente M. Diaz would put it, native understandings of community, place, region, and self in ways that critically redefine Asia and Asian America in the twenty-first century. “Indigenous Asias” will explore how Asian nations or national identities conceptualize indigeneity both within the geographic constructs of Asia and throughout Asian diasporic communities. We seek to examine how indigenous cultures or identities in Asia and Asian America are marginalized as “ethnic minorities,” rendered as “extinct,” or lauded as “loyal citizens” through cultural assimilation projects. What are the limits and consequences of such political constructs of the “indigenous” on human health, geopolitics, and the natural environment? Likewise, how are native lands memorialized and territorialized as “Asian” or “Asian American” in recent history, such as with Indonesia’s engagement in West Papua or as with the Asian labor movement in the U.S. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands? How do indigenous populations inside and outside Asia and Asian America engage with and resist settler cultures, transnational imperialism, or globalization in China, Japan, and the U.S.?

More vitally, we ask what exchanges exist between indigenous groups across regions, such as those in Northeast/Southeast Asia and their counterparts in the Americas and Oceania. What new transoceanic conversations have emerged, for instance, between Austronesians in Taiwan and the Pacific Islands, or between Ainu and Aleutian communities? What kinds of solidarities are created, for example, in Okinawan feminist engagements with indigenous sovereignty groups in Guam, Hawai‘i, Puerto Rico, and other “American” colonial sites? We thus invite contributions that ask how nuanced explorations of indigenous identities, cultural practices, networks, and geographies problematize the very notions of Asia or Asian-ness in the U.S. and internationally.

This special issue seeks papers of approximately 5,000 words in length. We encourage the submission of interdisciplinary and accessible writings that may be adopted for courses in Asian American Studies, American Studies, American Indian Studies, Asian Studies, Critical Ethnic Studies, and Pacific Islands Studies.

Submission Guidelines and Review Process
The guest editors, in consultation with the Amerasia Journal editorial staff and peer reviewers, make decisions on the final essays:

• Initial review of submitted papers by guest editors and Amerasia Journal editorial staff
• Papers approved by editors will undergo blind peer review
• Revision of accepted peer-reviewed papers and final submission

All correspondence should refer to “Amerasia Journal Indigenous Asias Issue” in the subject line.

Dr. Greg Dvorak: g.dvorak@r.hit-u.ac.jp
Dr. Miyume Tanji: miyume.tanji@anu.edu.au
Dr. Arnold Pan, Associate Editor, Amerasia Journal: arnoldpan@ucla.edu

2013-2014 Lucie Cheng Prize awarded to Jungha Kim of the University of Pennsylvania

The UCLA Asian American Studies Center and Amerasia Journal are pleased to announce that Ms. Jungha Kim, Department of Comparative Literature and Literary Theory, University of Pennsylvania, is the recipient of 2013-2014 Amerasia Journal Lucie Cheng Prize for her essay, “ ‘I’m Still at War with Myself…in This Beautiful Terrible City’:  Transnational Adoption and Endless Labor in Jane Jeong Trenka’s Fugitive Visions.  Ms. Kim was nominated by her advisor, Professor Josephine Park.

Ms. Kim is currently a Ph.D. student, working on transnational Asian American literature.  Her winning essay offers an original reading of Jane Jeong Trenka’s adoptee memoir Fugitive Visions (2009), deftly blending in psychoanalysis and spatial theory to a rigorous analysis of the text.  Delving into Trenka’s personal story and her feelings of alienation as a transnational adoptee returning to South Korea, Ms. Kim’s discussion of Fugitive Visions skillfully navigates subjective perspectives and transnational frames, addressing individual experiences and broader geopolitical structures.

The Lucie Cheng Prize recognizes exceptional graduate student essays in the interdisciplinary field of Asian American and Pacific Islander Studies.  The winning article is published in Amerasia Journal, with $1,500 awarded to the recipient.  The award-winning submission for the 2012-2013 Cheng Prize, “Recalling the Refugee: Culture Clash and Melancholic Racial Formation in Daughter from Danang,” by Ms. Linh Nguyen of the University of California, San Diego, appears in the current issue of Amerasia Journal (39:3, 2013).

The Lucie Cheng Prize honors the late Professor Lucie Cheng (1939-2010), a longtime faculty member of UCLA and the first permanent director of the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.  Professor Cheng was a pioneering scholar who brought an early and enduring transnational focus to the study of Asian Americans and issues such as gender, labor, and immigration.

For more information about the Lucie Cheng prize, see: http://www.aasc.ucla.edu/ajprize/

Booklaunch for Amerasia 39.3, featuring Chol Soo Lee Forum

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Amerasia Journal publishes latest issue, featuring Chol Soo Lee forum

39.2.finalcoverAmerasia Journal’s latest issue (39:3) marks the thirtieth anniversary of Chol Soo Lee’s release from death row with a forum that reminds Asian American Studies scholars and students of one of the first nationwide Asian American social movements. Pan-Asian, multigenerational, and transnational in scope, the Free Chol Soo Lee movement rallied around Lee’s cause after he was falsely convicted of a 1973 San Francisco Chinatown gang murder. Coordinated with the help of Richard S. Kim (University of California, Davis), the Chol Soo Lee forum offers an excerpt of Lee’s memoir and retrospective commentaries by those who worked tirelessly to free him, looking back at an important yet underappreciated moment in the formation of an Asian American consciousness. The UCLA Asian American Studies Center will commemorate the anniversary of Lee’s release with an event on Saturday, December 7, 2013. Chol Soo Lee, K.W. Lee, and other key players in the movement will be in attendance.

The annual open topic issue includes the 2012-2013 Lucie Cheng Prize for outstanding graduate research, awarded to Linh Nguyen of the University of California, San Diego for her essay “Recalling the Refugee: Culture Clash and Melancholic Racial Formation in Daughter from Danang.” The prize is named after the late Professor Lucie Cheng, former director of the UCLA Asian American Studies Center (1972-1987). Featured in the issue are Michael Masatsugu’s essay tracing the life and career of Japanese American Beat Generation poet Albert Saijo as well as Hannah Nahm’s original short story centered on the relationship between a Korean immigrant mother and her schizophrenic son.

Published by UCLA’s Asian American Studies Center since 1971, Amerasia Journal is regarded as the core journal in the field of Asian American Studies.

For more information on the upcoming Chol Soo Lee event, contact events@aasc.ucla.edu or visit the Center’s website. Copies of this issue will be available for purchase.

ORDERING INFORMATION

UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press
3230 Campbell Hall
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546
Phone: 310-825-2968

Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmerasiaJournal

Amerasia Journal is published three times a year: Spring, Summer/Fall, and Winter. Annual subscriptions for Amerasia Journal are $99.99 for individuals and $445.00 for libraries and other institutions. The annual subscription price includes access to the Amerasia Journal online database, with full-text versions of published issues dating back to 1971. Instructors interested in this issue for classroom use should contact the above email address to request a review copy.

Asian American Studies Center Press Book Sale!

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Fall Colloquium Series to feature Akemi Kikumura Yano, Oct. 14

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2013-2014 Lucie Cheng Prize: Call for Nominations

Amerasia Journal invites faculty to nominate exceptional graduate student essays (masters and doctoral level) in the interdisciplinary field of Asian American and Pacific Islander Studies for the 2013-14 Lucie Cheng Prize.  The selected article will be published in Amerasia Journal, with a $1500 prize to be awarded to the winner.

The Lucie Cheng Prize honors the late Professor Lucie Cheng (1939-2010), a longtime faculty member of UCLA and the first permanent director of the UCLA Asian American Studies Center (1972-1987).  Professor Cheng was a pioneering scholar who brought an early and enduring transnational focus to the study of Asian Americans and issues such as labor and immigration.

Submission: Nominations must be submitted via email by the graduate advisor by October 1, 2013, with notification to the winner by the end of the calendar year.

Nominations are to include:
1. Graduate Advisor Name, Title, Institution, and Contact Information
2. Graduate Advisor Recommendation (500 word limit)
3. Graduate Student Brief CV (2 pages)
4. Essay (5000-7000 words) in a MS-Word file, formatted according to the Amerasia Journal Style Sheet; for journal style guidelines, see: http://www.amerasiajournal.org/blog/?page_id=42.

Submit materials and queries to ajprize@aasc.ucla.edu and arnoldpan@ucla.edu.