Announcing: Call for 2015-16 Lucie Cheng Prize Nominations

2015-16 Lucie Cheng Prize Nominations

Amerasia Journal invites faculty to nominate exceptional graduate student essays (masters and doctoral level) in the interdisciplinary field of Asian American and Pacific Islander Studies for the 2015-16 Lucie Cheng Prize.  The selected article will be published in Amerasia Journal, with a $1,500 prize to be awarded to the winner.

The Lucie Cheng Prize honors the late Professor Lucie Cheng (1939-2010), a longtime faculty member of UCLA and the first permanent director of the UCLA Asian American Studies Center (1972-1987).  Professor Cheng was a pioneering scholar who brought an early and enduring transnational focus to the study of Asian Americans and issues such as labor and immigration.

Submission:  Nominations must be submitted via email by the graduate advisor by October 1, 2015, with notification to the winner by the end of the calendar year.

Nominations are to include:

1. Graduate Advisor Name, Title, Institution, and Contact Information

2. Graduate Advisor Recommendation (500-word limit)

3. Graduate Student Brief CV (2 pages)

4. Essay (5000-7000 words) in a MS-Word file, formatted according to the Amerasia Journal Style Sheet; for journal style guidelines, see:  http://www.amerasiajournal.org/blog/?page_id=42.

Submit materials and queries to ajprize@aasc.ucla.edu and arnoldpan@ucla.edu.

June 11-12, UCLA Symposium on Robots, Arts, & Difference

MD2 program

Call for Papers: Intergenerational Collaborations

Amerasia Journal Call for Papers

INTERGENERATIONAL COLLABORATIONS
Graduate Student Scholarship in Asian American Studies

Guest Editors:
Professor Yến Lê Espiritu (University of California, San Diego) and Professor Cathy J. Schlund-Vials (University of Connecticut)

Publication Date:
Summer/Fall 2016

Due Date:
Paper submissions (6,000 – 7,000 words, inclusive of endnotes) due September 1, 2015

Since finding a permanent publishing home at UCLA’s Asian American Studies Center Press in 1971, Amerasia Journal has served as a scholarly hub for Asian American Studies.  Slated for publication in Summer/Fall 2016, marking the journal’s forty-fifth anniversary, this special issue of Amerasia Journal brings together graduate student scholarship and faculty mentorship—two foundational components of the field of Asian American Studies.  The issue is innovative in two ways: it is devoted exclusively to graduate student work, and it pairs graduate student authors with senior scholars who will provide guidance during the revision process.  The guest editors will be responsible for selecting the papers to be sent out for review, and for connecting graduate student authors with appropriate senior scholars in the field.  Such “intergenerational” collaborations represent an Amerasia “first,” and the editors are guided by the desire to increase both access for and representation of graduate students in the field’s leading interdisciplinary journal.

As a key frame, the editors in part return to the journal’s mission statement, which reflects the founding, revisionary tenets of a field born out of civil rights movements and international liberation struggles.  The open nature of this call for submissions—which takes seriously the diversity of Asian American Studies scholarship—echoes the innovative, multidisciplinary work that has been a hallmark of Amerasia Journal.  Understanding that Asian American Studies has grown considerably over the past four decades, the editors ask possible contributors to situate their work within and beyond the context of this originating mission and multifaceted vision.

Submission Guidelines and Review Process:
The guest editors, in consultation with the Amerasia Journal editors, reviewers, and potential mentors, will make the decisions on which submissions will be included in the special issue.  The review process is as follows:

• Initial review of submitted papers by guest editors and Amerasia Journal editorial staff
• Papers approved by editors will undergo blind peer review
• Accepted projects will be assigned an appropriate mentor, who will work with the writer to develop and revise the submission; this process should begin and go through the last few months of 2015
• Revision of accepted papers and final submission for production

Please send correspondence and papers regarding the special issue to the following addresses. All correspondence should refer to “Amerasia Journal Intergenerational Collaborations” in the subject line.

Contacts:
Professor Yến Lê Espiritu: yespiritu@ucsd.edu
Professor Cathy J. Schlund-Vials: cathy.schlund-vials@uconn.edu
Arnold Pan, Associate Editor, Amerasia Journal: arnoldpan@ucla.edu

View or download PDF version of the CFP:  Intergenerational Collaborations

Amerasia Journal explores “Indigenous Asias” across the Pacific

Amerasia 41:1With its latest issue, Amerasia Journal explores how indigeneity is conceptualized within geographic boundaries and beyond into the diaspora. Guest edited by Greg Dvorak of Hitotsubashi University and Miyume Tanji of Australian National University, “Indigenous Asias” (Issue 41:1) engages local and global discussions of indigenous cultures and practices across the Pacific, including Hawai‘i, Japan, the Philippines, and Taiwan, that offer more complex understandings of cultural identity in today’s world. As the guest editors suggest, “when climate change and globalization threaten to overwhelm the entire world as we know it, indigenous peoples’ shared commitment to the environment, cultural heritage, and to the places for which they care so deeply sets a vital example for everyone.”

 

Guided by the guest editors’ call to examine “what exchanges exist between indigenous groups across regions” in the Asia Pacific, the contributions to this special issue consider how indigeneity defines, as well as complicates, ethnic identities in national as well as transnational frameworks. Addressing such concerns, Guy Beauregard offers insights on the life story of mixed-race writer/filmmaker Tony Coolidge and his attempts to identify with his indigenous Taiwanese lineage. Eliko Kosaka and Hueichu Chu, respectively, tackle how transpacific migrations have shaped Okinawan identity in literary texts such as Masao Yamashiro’s The Kibei Nisei and Sakiyama Tami’s “Island Confinement.”

 

Other contributors shed light on efforts of indigenous groups to assert a shared identity through political and cultural means. Ryan Masaaki Yokota interrogates Okinawan self-determination vis-à-vis United Nations protocols on indigenous rights, while Melisa Casumbal-Salazar points out the paradoxical way Philippine national culture treats indigeneity by attempting to celebrate the cultural production of once subjugated minority groups. Yu-wen Fu discusses the Taiwanese blockbuster film Seediq Bale and how it mobilized the political consciousness of the Seediq, one of the island’s recognized indigenous groups.

 

The issue also spotlights Peace Boat, a Japanese non-governmental organization that connects indigenous groups worldwide through educational voyages promoting peace and sustainability. Books reviewed in this issue include Yến Lê-Espiritu’s Body Counts: The Vietnam War and Militarized Refuge(es) and David Hanlon’s Making Micronesia: A Political Biography of Tosiwo Nakayama.

 

PDF of Amerasia Journal 41:1 Press Release

 

ORDERING INFORMATION

Copies of the issue can be ordered via phone, email, or mail. Each issue of Amerasia Journal costs $15.00 plus shipping/handling and applicable sales tax. Please contact the Center Press for detailed ordering information.

UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press
3230 Campbell Hall
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546
Phone: 310-825-2968
Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmerasiaJournal

 Amerasia Journal is published three times a year: Spring, Summer/Fall, and Winter. Annual subscriptions for Amerasia Journal are $99.00 for individuals and $445.00 for libraries and other institutions. The annual subscription price includes access to the Amerasia Journal online database, with full-text versions of published issues dating back to 1971. Instructors interested in this issue for classroom use should contact the above email address to request a review copy.

See you at AAAS Conference, April 23-25, 2015—Evanston, Illinois

evanston1evanston2

Chol Soo Lee Day of Remembrance, March 21, 2015

CSL Flyer

Asian American Studies at a Crossroads—Conference March 5-6, 2015

park, full conference program, 022115

tran, conference flyer, 020415

Call for Papers: Carceral States

Amerasia Journal Call for Papers

CARCERAL STATES
Converging Indigenous and Asian Experiences in the Americas

Guest Editors:
Professor Karen J. Leong (Arizona State University) and Professor Myla Vicenti Carpio (Arizona State University)

Publication Date:
Spring 2016

Due Date:
Paper submissions (up to 5,000 words) due May 1, 2015

Unfree labor, dispossession, and displacement are technologies of the carceral state, which depends upon the logics of control and punishment to create hierarchies of difference and normalize its deployment of violence.

In this special issue of Amerasia Journal, we call for papers and dialogues that examine the convergence of indigenous communities and Asian communities in the Americas as subjects of the carceral state, subject to nation-state attempts to refashion them into proper liberal and economic subjects through assimilation, dispossession, militarization, and relocation. What do such relational analyses tell us about the ways in which the carceral state improvises, reutilizes, and deploys diverse methods to constitute, in Michel Foucault’s words, “the power of normalization and the formation of knowledge” of what it means to be a productive citizen, a legible and proper subject? How do relational analyses of Asian communities in the Americas and indigenous communities further illuminate the workings of the carceral state within and beyond national borders? Why and how did settlers and the colonized both become subject to the carceral state and under what conditions? How did both communities’ resistance to, or rejection of, carceral technologies forge unexpected affinities or alliances? What insights do such relational histories of Asian diasporic and indigenous experiences reveal about the workings of the carceral state and what possible interventions might relational histories suggest?

Submission Guidelines and Review Process:
The guest editors, in consultation with the Amerasia Journal editors and peer reviewers, will make the decisions on which submissions will be included in the special issue. The review process is as follows:

• Initial review of submitted papers by guest editors and Amerasia Journal editorial staff
• Papers approved by editors will undergo blind peer review
• Revision of accepted peer-reviewed papers and final submission

This special issue seeks papers of approximately 5,000 words in length. We encourage the submission of interdisciplinary and accessible writings that may be adopted for courses in American Studies, American Indian Studies, Asian American Studies, Critical Ethnic Studies, and Pacific Islander Studies.

Please send correspondence and papers regarding the special issue on the carceral state in Asian American Studies to the following addresses. All correspondence should refer to “Amerasia Journal Carceral State Issue” in the subject line.

Professor Karen J. Leong: Karen.Leong@asu.edu
Professor Myla Vicenti Carpio: Vicenti@asu.edu
Dr. Arnold Pan, Associate Editor, Amerasia Journal: arnoldpan@ucla.edu

View or download the PDF version of the Call for Papers – Carceral States

Yuri Kochiyama & Tempt One Featured in Amerasia 40.3

AJ40.3coverThe latest issue of Amerasia Journal brings the stories of two powerful people to our readers.  The first is a 32-page tribute to the late Yuri Kochiyama, who passed away in June of 2014.  A collection of remembrances from three generations of family members (tributes that were given at her three memorials spanning August to the end of September), along with notable writers & a filmmaker who have been influenced by Kochiyama—Karen Tei Yamashita, Thandisizwe Chimurenga, Renee Tajima-Peña, and Diane Fujino—make up this tribute section, including a vintage location shot from the making of the documentary My America, or Honk if You Love Buddha.

That being said, the cover images of this issue point to a second powerful story about L.A. graffiti artist Tempt One who has been diagnosed with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis aka Lou Gehrig’s Disease) for 12 years, and has been stricken with paralysis for most of those years.  It was an artistic decision on my part to put Tempt One’s work on the cover because it really needs to be seen in color.  Ben Higa’s article “Tempt” highlights Tempt’s impact on the L.A. graffiti and art scene, and also documents the contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to the local hip hop culture.  The UCLA AASCPress has donated 50 copies of this issue to the Tempt One ALS Foundation, to help raise funds for Tempt’s continued 24-hour care.  Tempt One’s story is one of amazing perseverance to keep on keeping on and expressing himself, now through an eye writer, that was developed to help him (and since, others like him) communicate with the world.

I’ve posted some photos of our visit with Tempt One.  Ben Higa organized the visit, which included Jose “DJ Dwenz” Buktaw, Ben, and my husband and I.  Ben hadn’t seen Tempt for eight years and Jose for 11 years.  So it was a long overdue reunion that we were honored to be a part.  Tempt’s dad, Ron Quan, joined us and Tempt’s hospital room was quite cozy—us four visitors, Ron Quan, and Tempt’s day nurse Keyasia, who took the picture of the six of us.

It was mystifying to see Tempt typing his communication with us using his eye movements to hit letters on a computer screen and then hearing a computer voice speaking his words.  I didn’t realize at first that it was him talking to us through the computer, peppered with lots of “haha’s.” As Ben showed him the issue with Tempt’s self-portrait prominently on the cover, Tempt humbly said that Yuri should have been on the cover.

Ben Higa shows Tempt the Amerasia cover with Tempt's self portrait.

Ben Higa shows Tempt the Amerasia cover with Tempt’s self portrait.

It was an inspiring moment to meet this street artist who has the heart of a warrior. His struggle to keep communicating and expressing himself despite his physical paralysis just makes you stop and try to imagine the incomprehensible. His story has inspired a documentary, as well as the invention of the eyewriter, and now with Ben Higa’s article in Amerasia, has opened up a peek for us into Tempt’s impact in the graffiti world.

If you would like to help, you can make donations to Tempt through Paypal or by sending a check—

Checks can be made payable to:

Tempt One ALS Foundation
P.O. Box 206
5280 Beverly Blvd. Suite C
Los Angeles CA, 90022

Paypal donations can be made at:

http://temptone.wordpress.com/foundation/

All donations are tax deductible and go directly towards Tempt’s immediate care as well as others suffering from this terrible disease.

To learn more about Tempt One—

from lower left clockwise:  Ron Quan (Tempt's dad), John and Mary Kao, Tempt, Jose "DJ Dwenz" Buktaw, and Ben Higa.

from lower left clockwise: Ron Quan (Tempt’s dad), John and Mary Kao, Tempt, Jose “DJ Dwenz” Buktaw, and Ben Higa.

http://temptone.wordpress.com/bio/

http://gettingup-thedoc.com/

http://www.eyewriter.org/

Tempt One with his dad, Ron Quan.

Tempt One with his dad, Ron Quan.

"7 Samurai from the Far Eastside" rooftop mural for the DADA 1997 annual art show.  Mural features street artists SLICK, TEMPT, HYDE, RELIC, DUKE, PRIME, and SKEPT with calligraphic graffiti by Chaz Bojórquez. Photograph by Ben Higa

“7 Samurai from the Far Eastside” rooftop mural for the DADA 1997 annual art show. Mural features street artists SLICK, TEMPT, HYDE, RELIC, DUKE, PRIME, and SKEPT with calligraphic graffiti by Chaz Bojórquez.
Photograph by Ben Higa

Amerasia Journal pays tribute to Yuri Kochiyama, features work of graffiti artist Tempt One

AJ40.3coverThe latest open-topic issue of Amerasia Journal highlights our longstanding commitments to the Asian American community, with a tribute to Yuri Kochiyama and a spotlight on renowned graffiti artist Tempt One.  To commemorate the passing of Yuri Kochiyama—one of the true giants of Asian America—Amerasia‘s own Mary Uyematsu Kao compiled tributes from those who knew the pioneering political activist the best, from family members, kindred spirits, and faithful followers.  We hear the remembrances of three generations of Yuri Kochiyama’s immediate family, as well as thoughts on her politics and life from Thandisizwe Chimurenga, Diane Fujino, Renee Tajima-Peña, and Karen Tei Yamashita.

Amerasia Journal Issue 40:3 presents the work of Tempt One, an influential artist in the hip-hop community who has continued to create art after being diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) over a decade ago.  Along with journalist Ben Higa‘s brief history of his friend’s significance to graffiti art in Los Angeles and beyond, we include a brief portfolio of Tempt’s work and reprint a first-person account from the artist himself, composed through specially designed software that allows him to type with his eyes.

Amerasia is also pleased to publish the winning essay for the 2013-2014 Lucie Cheng Prize for outstanding graduate student research by Jungha Kim, titled “‘I’m Still at War with Myself': Transnational Adoption and Endless Labor in Jane Jeong Trenka’s Fugitive Visions“; a recent Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, Jungha Kim was nominated for the award by her advisor, Professor Josephine Park.  The prize is named after the late Professor Lucie Cheng, former director of the UCLA Asian American Studies Center (1972-1987).

Rounding out the issue is new research on the subversive use of humor in Miné Okubo’s Citizen 13660 by Stella Oh (Loyola Marymount University) and E. San Juan, Jr.‘s exploration of the Huk Rebellion in the Philippines as recounted in Benjamin Appel’s 1951 novel, Fortress in the Rice.  The issue also includes book reviews of recent titles in Asian American Studies, featuring Robert Ku’s Dubious Gastronomy and Hoang Tan Nguyen’s A View from the Bottom.

Published by UCLA’s Asian American Studies Center since 1971, Amerasia Journal is regarded as the core journal in the field of Asian American Studies.

ORDERING INFORMATION: Purchase online via the AASC Press Store. Copies of the issue can also be ordered via phone, email, or mail. Each issue of Amerasia Journal costs $15.00 plus shipping/handling and applicable sales tax. Please contact the Center Press for detailed ordering information.

UCLA Asian American Studies Center Press
3230 Campbell Hall | Los Angeles, CA 90095-1546
Phone: 310-825-2968 | Email: aascpress@aasc.ucla.edu
Blog: http://www.amerasiajournal.org/blog/  |  Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmerasiaJournal
Amerasia Journal is published three times a year: Spring, Summer/Fall, and Winter. Annual subscriptions for Amerasia Journal are $99.00 for individuals and $445.00 for libraries and other institutions. Instructors interested in this issue for classroom use should
contact the above email address to request a review copy.

View as a PDF (AJ 40_3_Release).